Peyton Manning ‘Cautious’ After Neck Surgery Thanks To NFL Lockout

quarterback , his second in the past 15 months. But his recovery has been slowed because of NFL lockout rules restricting players from receiving medical attention from their team, as well as an inability to use team facilities for rehabilitation. When the lockout began, team facilities were shuddered, forcing players to workout on their own and seek their own treatment for various injuries picked up during the season or for surgeries that took place after the season ended.

that the familiarity with the Colts’ training staff provided him comfort, but with that gone he’s been forced to proceed with caution.

“The lockout didn’t allow me to work my (Colts) therapist, Erin Barill, and I’m just not comfortable taking any chances with this thing,” Manning said. “Erin knows me. He’s rehabbed me through two other surgeries (neck and knee) and I think most people understand that once you build up a trust with your therapist, that’s the guy you want and need to work with.”

The inability for injured players to rehab with their own teams and receive in-house medical treatment has been one of the more unfortunate parts of the lockout. Players injured during the season, playing under contract for the owners that have no locked them out, have been stuck in no-man’s land as the NFL and NFLPA battle it out over billions of dollars.

For more on Manning’s surgery, stay with . For more on the labor situation, visit our StoryStream.

Peyton Manning ‘Cautious’ After Neck Surgery Thanks To NFL Lockout

quarterback , his second in the past 15 months. But his recovery has been slowed because of NFL lockout rules restricting players from receiving medical attention from their team, as well as an inability to use team facilities for rehabilitation. When the lockout began, team facilities were shuddered, forcing players to workout on their own and seek their own treatment for various injuries picked up during the season or for surgeries that took place after the season ended.

that the familiarity with the Colts’ training staff provided him comfort, but with that gone he’s been forced to proceed with caution.

“The lockout didn’t allow me to work my (Colts) therapist, Erin Barill, and I’m just not comfortable taking any chances with this thing,” Manning said. “Erin knows me. He’s rehabbed me through two other surgeries (neck and knee) and I think most people understand that once you build up a trust with your therapist, that’s the guy you want and need to work with.”

The inability for injured players to rehab with their own teams and receive in-house medical treatment has been one of the more unfortunate parts of the lockout. Players injured during the season, playing under contract for the owners that have no locked them out, have been stuck in no-man’s land as the NFL and NFLPA battle it out over billions of dollars.

For more on Manning’s surgery, stay with . For more on the labor situation, visit our StoryStream.

Despite NFL lockout, Colts work to gets fans ready for season

Lockout or no lockout, the Indianapolis Colts are getting ready for the season. The team is preparing to kick off its annual “Make It Personal” tour. The first stop is in Avon, on Wednesday, June 1st at 5 p.m. at the AAA office on U.S. 36.

On hand will be a Colts player or alumni and cheerleader. Fans can draw for a chance at pre-season tickets. You can also donate blood through the “Bleed Blue Blood Drive.”

for more information on the Colts “Make It Personal” tour, including dates, times and locations.